Scenes from Frog Hollow Farm’s “Peaches & Tango”

Nectarine tree at Frog Hollow Farm.

It’s not every day that you find giant canisters of liquid nitrogen and elaborate sous vide cooking equipment on a bucolic fruit farm.

But when “Top Chef All-Stars” Champ Richard Blais visits to cook an elaborate fund-raising dinner for 175 folks, that’s just what you need to make it all happen.

The occasion was Saturday’s “Peaches & Tango: A Dinner in the Orchard” at Frog Hollow Farm in Brentwood, an evening of gourmet eats, live music and tango dancing performances by Trio Garufa. Proceeds benefited the Chez Panisse Foundation.

Chef Richard Blais tears the skin off of fried chicken to serve it as a garnish with hamachi crudo.

Yours truly served as emcee for the fun event, which marked my first time visiting this incredible farm.

The evening kicked off with a short tour of the 133-acre organic farm, which grows outstanding olives, cherries, apricots, pluots, nectarines and some of the most incredible peaches you will ever taste.

In his trademark overalls, Farmer Al shows the damage gophers caused on this organic farm.

Farmer Al Courchesne joked that the farm is 36 years old — younger than its best customer, the 40-year-old Chez Panisse in Berkeley; and older than its most famous customer, Apple in Cupertino.

The evening's menu.

Guests dined outdoors in the orchard.

Dinner was outdoors in the orchard at long tables set with candles, peaches and plums as decorations.

Under a nearby tent, Blais worked with a small crew to prepare the four-course dinner, then took to the stage before each dish was served to describe what he had made.

Blais explains the dishes he made for the dinner.

Luscious pork belly with a velvety peach-cauliflower sauce was cooked sous vide with an immersion circulator that had to be borrowed from Spice Kit in San Francisco just for this event.

Raw hamachi with crunchy, fried chicken skin. Trust me, it works.

Turbot cutlet with cherry tomato and anchovy raisin butter.

The highlight for me was the first course of chilled hamachi, “fried chicken” and smoked aioli. Imagine slices of hamachi done crudo-style with slivers of the best, crunchy fried chicken skin topping it with delicate julienned radishes. The pairing might boggle at first. But it works. Soft with crisp, clean with fatty. Amazing.

Quince tree.

One of the many varieties of peaches the farm is famous for.

As for the liquid nitrogen? It was used to make the dessert of ice cream scooped into homemade cones.

Dinner on a farm has never been so trendy.

More: Nectarine-Frangipane Galette Made with Frog Hollow Farm’s Fruit

And: Frog Hollow Farm’s Warren Pears

And: A Visit to Spice Kit in San Francisco

Plus: My Recent Judging of a “Top Chef” Quick-Fire Challenge in San Jose

Lastly: My Q&A with “Top Chef” Alum Kevin Gillespie

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