Category Archives: Enticing Events

Join the Food Gal and Cookbook Author Katie Chin For A Macy’s Union Square Demo

AsianHM rev.inddJoin yours truly when I trek to Macy’s Cellar in San Francisco’s Union Square to host cookbook author and Asian foods expert Katie Chin for a cooking demo, 6 p.m. May 26

It’s all part of the salute to Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

Los Angeles-based Chin is the author of “Katie Chin’s Everyday Chinese Cookbook” (Tuttle Publishing); and creator of the blog, The Sweet And Sour Chronicles. She’s also appeared as a judge on “Iron Chef America” and a contestant on “Cutthroat Kitchen.”

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Food Gal #Foodtography Event at the Four Seasons San Francisco, Le Cirque Dinner Event, And More

FourSeasonsFoodtographyYou’re Invited to #Foodtography

Join yours truly and award-winning photographer Craig Lee, when we host #Foodtography, 7 p.m. May 25 at the Four Seasons in San Francisco.

In this age of food-ecentric social media, this fun event will teach you how to be a better food critic and how to take better food photos.

You’ll get to sample gourmet tastes from the Four Seasons’ Chef Alexander La Motte — after you get a chance to photograph the dishes, of course.

At the end of the evening, you’ll take home a copy of “San Francisco Chef’s Table” (Lyons Press), my cookbook that was photographed by Craig. We’ll personally sign it to you, too.

The event is $35 per person. If you don’t take public transportation, and need to park your car, the hotel is offering a discounted valet rate of $15 that evening. RSVP to erissa.kido@fourseasons.com.

“A Taste of Le Cirque” in San Jose

San Jose’s Capital Club, normally open to members only, is opening its doors wide for a special event this Friday, May 13 that celebrates the fabled New York restaurant, Le Cirque.

A Taste of Le Cirque” will feature Le Cirque’s corporate executive chef Massimo Bebber cooking a five-course dinner paired with Sicilian wines.

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Chamba’s Soup(er) Pot and A Food Gal Giveaway

La Chamba soup pot. (photo courtesy of La Chamba)

La Chamba soup pot. (photo courtesy of La Chamba)

 

Whenever I make a big pot of soup, I do so in a cheery lapis Le Creuset that I practically fill to overflow with stock and plenty of veggies and heirloom beans.

But imagine making soup in the striking pot pictured above. Its shape makes it ideal, doesn’t it?

Indeed, it was created just for that purpose, handmade in Columbia from black clay that contains mica, which allows it to withstand a lot of heat, as well as to retain heat.

La Chamba cookware is revered for its beauty and its performance. The unglazed pot can go on the stovetop, in the oven or even the microwave (well, if you’re using a small piece).

Just don’t put it in the dishwasher, though. And before using it for the first time, it must be seasoned by filling it three-quarters of the way with water and baking in a hot oven for half an hour.

Its bulbous shape makes me think of Chinese winter melon soup, a soothing sip if there ever was one.

At Chinese banquet meals, that soup would arrive inside the cavity of the huge winter melon itself, its thick jade-green rind often carved intricately with Chinese characters and its flesh having been scooped into balls or chunks to simmer in the bubbling broth.

My Mom often made a more simplified version in winter fortified with small slivers of chicken that had been coated in egg white to add tenderness.

With its quenching, almost watermelon-like texture, and its mild, subtle natural sweetness, it makes for a soup that goes down comfortingly and easily, and somehow always makes me think of family.

CONTEST: One lucky Food Gal reader will win a large, 6-quart La Chamba soup pot (a $69.95 value), courtesy of Toque Blanche, a gourmet cookware store in Half Moon Bay, which also has a sister store, Chefworks of Santa Cruz. It is the only direct importer in California that stocks the entire La Chamba line.

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The (Cheese) Table

Ribbons of Bohemian Creamery's Capriago cheese cover the top of mushroom-pork ragout with grits at The Table.

Ribbons of Bohemian Creamery’s Capriago cheese cover the top of mushroom-pork ragout with grits at The Table.

 

Last week, San Jose’s The Table was transformed into the cheese table.

The popular Willow Glen neighborhood restaurant hosted its inaugural cheese dinner. This one spotlighted the cheeses of Bohemian Creamery of Sebastapol in a $75 seven-course dinner that included paired beverages. I was lucky enough to be invited in as a guest of the restaurant, which plans to make the cheese dinner an annual event.

Owner and cheesemaker Lisa Gottreich was on hand to talk about her hand-made cheeses, which are sold at retailers such as the Cheese Board in Berkeley and Sunshine Foods in St. Helena, and featured at restaurants such as Ad Hoc in Yountville, Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Nopa in San Francisco and SPQR in San Francisco.

Gottreich makes her 13 types of cheeses the Italian-way, with little salt. The goat cheeses are made with milk from her own herd of goats. The other types of milk that go into her cheeses are purchased from nearby farms.

In the far right, Chef-Owner Jim Stump greets cheesemaker Lisa Bottreich in the dining room of The Table.

In the far right, Chef-Owner Jim Stump greets cheesemaker Lisa Bottreich in the dining room of The Table.

The kitchen at work with Chef "AJ'' Jmenez in the baseball cap.

The kitchen at work with Chef “AJ” Jmenez in the baseball cap.

The first course brought her Bodacious five-day-old goat cheese with a bloomy rind in a spring dish of asparagus and Oro Blanco grapefruit that was paired with Sikyo “Mirror of Truth” Takehara Junmai sake. What a great way to start with a creamy, tangy cheese and a floral, clean sake that worked well with the always tricky-to-pair asparagus.

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You’re Invited To #Foodtography With the Food Gal and Craig Lee

SunnyvaleLibraryWorkshopDo you like to share your opinions about food? And photograph what you eat or cook?

Then, you’ll want to join me and award-winning food photographer Craig Lee when we host a workshop, “#Footography,” 7 p.m. April 25 at the Sunnyvale Public Library.

I’ll share the in’s and out’s of food writing these days — whether it be a simple post on Facebook or an in-depth magazine story or even writing a cookbook. Want to break into food writing? Learn what it takes, as well as the benefits and the pitfalls involved. Want to start your own food blog? Learn what that entails — the good, the bad and the crazy.

Craig, who for years was the main food photographer for the San Francisco Chronicle’s food section, will teach you how to compose, light and shoot better food photos — no matter if you’re using a camera phone or a DSLR.

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