Category Archives: New Products

Kuvee — A New Way To Enjoy Wine At Home (Sponsored Post)

Introducing the Kuvee wine system.

Introducing the Kuvee wine system.

 

You might not guess from looks alone, but those bottles above are actually the equivalent of boxed wines. Only in clever bottle format.

Kuvee is a new wine system that not only allows you to open a bottle of wine and keep its contents stable for up to 30 days without oxidation, but to access information about that wine on a computer screen positioned where the wine label would normally be. You can even rate the wine or order more of it with a touch of the screen.

The wine system was founded by serial entrepreneur Vijay Manwani, who has already raised $60 million in venture capital investment for it.

So how does it work?

For $199, you get a Kuvee bottle with four wines, a mix of reds and whites, or only red or only white, if you like.

It's a system that uses specially designed wine bottles.

It’s a system that uses specially designed wine bottles.

Each wine bottle holds the equivalent of a standard 750ml bottle. But these are no ordinary bottles. They’re not glass, but plastic. A hard valve is inserted in the neck of each bottle, explains Michael Meagher, a Master Sommelier on the Kuvee team. The valve closes when the bottle is upright, sealing it airtight. But when the Kuvee bottle is slipped over the wine bottle, the valve is opened, allowing the wine to pour out. Inside each bottle is a collapsible food-grade film bag that holds the wine. As the wine is poured, the bag collapses, just like it would in a boxed wine. Once empty, the wine bottle can be recycled.

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From Roy’s — Or The Story of the $50 Panettone

From Roy's dark chocolate panettone -- fit for a king or queen.

From Roy’s dark chocolate panettone — fit for a king or queen.

 

When I told my husband, who is notoriously frugal (he’d call himself, “cheap”), that I was writing a story about a pastry chef who makes a $50 panettone, he was beside himself.

He rolled his eyes, completely flabbergasted. Who in their right minds, he thought, would pay that much for an Italian Christmas bread that you can get for a song on the shelves at Cost Plus?

Then, I cut him a thick slab of the handmade dark chocolate panettone made by From Roy’s of Richmond. He put a forkful in his mouth. He let out a sigh. Then, he actually said, “OK, I can see paying $50 for this.”

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Fulton Fish Market Debuts New Online Delivery

Atlantic halibut delivered to my door via Fulton Fish Market that I cooked up for dinner.

Atlantic halibut delivered to my door via Fulton Fish Market that I cooked up for dinner.

 

The Fulton Fish Market has a storied history.

Originally established in 1822, it is one of the oldest markets in the country. Over the years, it has also grown into one of the most important East Coast fish markets in the country. Second in size only to Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo, it handles millions of pounds of seafood daily from the United States and internationally.

Recently, it started a new online delivery program for consumers, which I was invited to try out for free.

I received two samples: A one-pound fillet ($35) of Fjord salmon, farm-raised in Denmark without antibiotics or GMOs; and a one-pound fillet ($27) of wild Atlantic halibut. They arrived in the mail neatly wrapped in plastic wrap and packed with ice packs.

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Of Books, Stores & More

Ina Yalof has authored a new book, called "Food and the City"

Ina Yalof has authored a new book, called “Food and the City”

“Food and The City”

My favorite read of the year has to be Food and The City (G.P. Putnam’s Sons). Think of the legendary, mesmerizing oral histories done by Studs Terkel, only concentrated on the food industry.

That’s just what journalist Ina Yalof has created in this book by shining a spotlight on people in the New York culinary world who aren’t often in the limelight. The profiles are not the usual celeb chefs, though there are chefs included. But rather, they are people like Mohamed Abouelenein, founder of the wildly popular Halal Guys food truck who also happens to hold a doctorate in veterinarian medicine; Alessandro Borgognone, an Italian restaurateur, who was spurred by an argument with his wife and watching “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” to open what would become a four-star omakase in Manhattan with one of Jiro’s apprentices; and Tunisian-born Ghaya Oliveira, who was on her way to becoming a stock trader when family tragedy struck and she was forced to pivot, only to eventually find herself rising through the ranks to executive pastry chef of Restaurant Daniel.

It just goes to show that real-life can so often outshine the best fiction.

Yalof is not a food writer per se, but a reporter who most often delves into topics such as science, medicine and religion. But her keen investigative sense serves her well here as she delves deeply into these people’s lives to find out how they got where they are today. Because they are recounted in oral histories, and this is a New York-based book, one of the pleasures is the vernacular on display. If you’ve ever visited New York, especially the old-school delis and mom-and-pop stores there, you know how colorful and distinctive native New York-speak is. It leaps off the pages here, making you feel as if you’re ease-dropping on a conversation by old-timers at Katz’s.

If you’re looking for a book to get lost in, that’s full of fun yet also remarkable insight, this is the one.

Celebrate the New Williams-Sonoma in San Mateo

San Mateo’s Hillsdale Shopping Center will welcome a new Williams-Sonoma store that also includes Williams-Sonoma home furnishings.

Chef Ryan Pollnow will be showing off his Basque-style tapas at the opening of the new store. (Photo courtesy of Williams-Sonoma)

Chef Ryan Pollnow will be showing off his Basque-style tapas at the opening of the new store. (Photo courtesy of Williams-Sonoma)

To kick-off the opening, the store will host a series of events, starting at 7 p.m. Oct. 6 when Chef Ryan Pollnow of Aaxte restaurant in San Francisco serves up an array of pinxtos or Basque-style tapas with a gin & tonics. Register for this free opening party by clicking here.

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Pedigreed Pasta

A simple pasta dish becomes extra special with Community Grains organic whole grain pastas.

A simple pasta dish becomes extra special with Community Grains organic whole grain pastas.

 

There are a lot of things to like about the new varieties of Community Grains pastas.

First, they’re all made from organic whole grain that’s grown and milled in Northern California.

Second, they boast transparency in the process — labeling each box with a code that you can plug into its Web site to find information about the farm that grew the particular wheat, the seed source, type of wheat, soil it was grown in, and not only when it was milled but by what type of mill.

Third, at a time when commodity wheat is grown for high yield and uniformity, the varieties of wheat that make up these pastas are grown for their distinctiveness and flavor. The pastas are made in small batches using Italian bronze dies, then slowly air-dried to enhance the wheat flavor.

And fourth, what flavor it is. While so many supermarket pastas just offer something to put sauce on, these artisan pastas can handle the simplest of toppings because they have enough flavor and character to stand out all on their own.

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